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Department of Linguistics & Communication Disorders
Division of Arts & Humanities
Queens College
City University of New York

65-30 Kissena Blvd.
Flushing, NY 11367-1597
Tel 718-997-2870
Fax 718-997-2873
http://www.qc.cuny.edu/LCD

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Undergraduate Major in Applied Linguistics: Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL)



This program prepares students for an Initial Certificate to teach English to speakers of other languages (TESOL) in New York State public schools (all grades). The curriculum is grounded in the study of the structure of human language in general and English in particular, and addresses issues of language acquisition, literacy, educational technology, sociolinguistics, and psycholinguistics. The program emphasizes involvement with both elementary and secondary schools: it provides a student teaching course and field experiences in two methods courses at both levels.

Students must see a departmental adviser for certification requirements (tests, seminars, liberal arts and sciences courses, etc.) and for filing a Program of Study.

Requirements for the Major

  • Satisfactory completion of the following 59 credits: LCD 101, 120, 130, 205, 206, 220, 240, 241, 307, 312, 340, 341, 342; 116 or 360; 209 or 306; SEYS 201, 221; EECE 310.
  • No course will count toward the major with a grade lower than C-.
  • Passing the English Language Proficiency Test of the LCD department prior to taking LCD 240. Proficiency is evaluated by the faculty based on a short written narrative and a taped interview with a faculty member.

Course Descriptions

LCD 101. Introduction to Language. 3 hr.; 3 cr. A survey of the study of language: Structure, language and society, first and second language acquisition, and other related topics. (Fulfills LASAR Humanities III requirement.)

LCD 116. The Structure of English Words. 3 hr.; 3 cr. The structure of English vocabulary; how words are formed; rules for determining the meaning, spelling, and pronunciation of English words.

LCD 120. The Syntactic Structure of English I. 3 hr.; 3 cr. The study of the structure of sentences in English, with implications for TESOL, Part I.

LCD 130. The Sound Structure of English. 3 hr.; 3 cr. The study of the articulation and patterning of sounds in English, with implications for TESOL.

LCD 205. Sociolinguistics. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: LCD 101 or 104 or 105. Introduction to the study of the relationship between language and society. Socio-cultural factors which influence language form, use, and history. (Fulfills one of the LASAR requirements in the Social Sciences.)

LCD 206. Bilingualism. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: LCD 101 or 105. Psychological, social, and educational aspects of bilingualism. There are several writing assignments in this course. (Fulfills one of the LASAR requirements in the Social Sciences.)

LCD 209. Language and Mind. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: LCD 101. Influential views in the acquisition of language; the relationship between language and thought; the relationship between language and culture/world view.

LCD 220. The Syntactic Structure of English II. 3 hr.; 3 cr. The study of the structure of sentences in English, with implications for TESOL, Part II. Continuation of LCD 120.

LCD 240. Second Language Acquisition and Teaching. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: LCD 101 and satisfactory performance on the department’s English Language Proficiency Test. The application of linguistic science to teaching in language-related areas. Includes a survey of research in the linguistic, psychological, and sociolinguistic aspects of second language acquisition. There is a substantial writing commitment in this course.

LCD 241. Methods and Materials of TESOL: Listening, Speaking, Reading, Writing. 3 hr. plus 50 hr. of fieldwork; 4 cr. Coreq./Prereq.: LCD 240, SEYS 201, 221, EECE 310. Prereq.: LCD 120 and 130. This course is an introduction to the methods and materials used in TESOL/ESL courses. We will focus on applying these methods to the teaching of the four skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The class covers how to adapt methods and materials to suit learner populations of different ages and at varying levels of English proficiency. The role of instructional technology (e.g. audiovisual, multimedia, computers in ESL instruction) will also be addressed. There is a field experience requirement in a variety of school settings in conformity with New York State Certification requirements. Classes may sometimes be held at these locations.

LCD 306. Semantics and Pragmatics. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Coreq./Prereq.: LCD 220. A survey of properties of meaning in language (semantics) and communication strategies people use when they talk to each other (pragmatics). There is a substantial writing commitment in this course.

LCD 307. Assessment in TESOL. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Coreq./Prereq.: LCD 340. An introduction to the field of language assessment, with particular emphasis on TESOL. Basic concepts in measurement and statistics, standardized and classroom-based language test development and evaluation, standards-based assessment—with particular reference to New York State ESL and content-area standards—and assessment of specific language skills. How to design classroom-based language tests (objectives- and standards-referenced), to articulate the rationale for a self-designed test, and to become informed users of tests taken by New York State English language learners.

LCD 312. Literacy and Language Arts in Multicultural Populations. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: LCD 241. This course provides a theoretical and practical background in the issues related to the development of reading and writing for second language, bilingual children and adolescents. Among the units are the relationships between oral and written language, the role of oral language acquisition and phonemic awareness, the influence of socio-cultural factors, developing advanced literacy through the language arts and literature, and the effect of specific language disabilities. The course will include assessment, methods, and materials development.

LCD 340. Methods and Materials of TESOL: The Content Areas. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Coreq.: LCD 341. Prereq.: LCD 241. Introduction to the theory and practice of language teaching approaches used in TESOL/ESL courses which focus on thematic units and subject areas, i.e., mathematics, science, social studies, and language arts. With particular attention to the development of language and literacy skills, the course will include adaptation of methods and materials to suit non-native speakers of English as well as special education students at the elementary and secondary levels.

LCD 341. Student Teaching Internship in TESOL I. 3 hr. plus 20 hr. per week of student teaching; 5 cr. Coreq.: LCD 340. Supervised student teaching in ESL classes at either the elementary or secondary level, plus a weekly seminar at the College.

LCD 342. Student Teaching Internship in TESOL II. 3 hr. plus 20 hr. per week of student teaching; 5 cr. Prereq.: LCD 340 and 341. Supervised student teaching in ESL classes at either the elementary or secondary level, complementing the level of student teaching in LCD 341, plus a weekly seminar at the College.

LCD 360. Issues in Linguistic Research. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: LCD 101. This course focuses on contemporary issues in any of the major branches of linguistics. May be repeated for credit when topics vary sufficiently. There is a substantial writing commitment in this course.

SEYS 201. Historical, Social and Philosophical Foundations of Education. 3 hr.; 3 cr.; 20 hr. field experience. Designed to examine the historical, philosophical and sociological foundations of American education. Attention will be paid to comparative analysis of past and contemporary historical, philosophical, and sociological factors that have, and continue to, influence and shape education decision-making. Theoretical analysis of major educational ideas and practices in the United States will be explored.

SEYS 221. Development and Learning in Middle Childhood and Adolescence. 3 hr.; 3 cr.; 20 hr. field experience. An examination of the major human development and learning processes in middle childhood and adolescence. It includes cognitive, behavioral, social, emotional, and physical issues as these relate to student diversity (culture, heritage, SES, gender, race, ethnicity and the full range of disabilities and exceptionalities). To the extent that development and learning occur in context, the role and impact of the home, school and community on these processes will also be investigated.

EECE 310. Children in Cultural Contexts I: Child Development. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: Open only to juniors. For initial certificate in Childhood Education, 1-6 this course should be taken after EECE 201, and concurrently with EECE 340. Students in other initial certificate programs may also enroll in this course. This course will provide an introduction to developmental processes from birth through adolescence and their implications for classroom practice. Starting from an ecological perspective, students explore the influences of environmental factors such as family, culture, and economics on the development of the individual. Individual differences, the range of normal development, and strategies for accommodating individual variability in the classroom will be emphasized.