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Click here for the upcoming semester's course schedule: Fall 2017
Click here for past semester course schedules: Previous Schedules


INTRODUCTORY-LEVEL COURSES                           INTERMEDIATE-LEVEL COURSES                            ADVANCED COURSES
INTRODUCTORY COURSES
Anthropology 101, 102, and 103 are designed to give a meaningful survey of anthropology, and are a recommended as a suite. There is no necessary sequence.

101. Introduction to Cultural Anthropology 3 hr.; 3 cr
This course introduces students to the range of human cultural diversity through an exploration of the variety of societies and cultures of the world. The course also familiarizes students with the methods and theories that anthropologists use to describe, analyze and explain cultures.

102. Introduction to Human Evolution 3 hr.; 3 cr
A survey of the basic principles of: evolution and genetics, biological variation in living human populations, a comparison of humans and other primates, and the fossil evidence of human evolution.

103. Introduction to Archaeology 3 hr.; 3 cr
This lecture course traces the major developments in human history and illustrates the methods archaeologists use to study the past. The origins of cultural behavior, the invention of agriculture and its consequences, and the development of civilization are examined.

104./LCD 104 Language, Culture, and Society 3 hr.; 3 cr
The role of language as a significant aspect of culture as well as linguistic and cultural diversity around the world is considered in this survey of anthropological linguistics.

108./LCD 101. Introduction to Language. 3 hr.; 3 cr
A survey of the study of language: Structure, language and society, first and second laguage acquisition, and other related topics.

134W. Writing Tutorial. 1 hr.; 1 cr
A one-credit add-on course to a regular subject matter course on a co-registration basis. This course works on writing that is relevant to the subject matter of the main course. Co-registration means that all students in the regular course will not necessarily be in the writing tutorial. The combination of a regular course and an Anthropology Writing Tutorial satisfies one of the College's writing intensive unit requirements. May be repeated for credit.

135W. Anthropology Writing Workshop. 1 hr.; 1 cr
A one-credit add-on course to a regular subject matter course on a co-requisite basis. This course works on writing that is integral to the subject matter on the main course. Co-requisite means that all students in the regular course will be in the writing workshop. The combination of a regular course and an Anthropology Writing Workshop satisfies one of the College's writing intensive unit requirements. May be repeated for credit.

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INTERMEDIATE-LEVEL COURSES
Intermediate-level courses are sophomore and junior-level courses designed to provide focused examples of the methods and results of anthropological research. The concepts presented in the Introductory courses are applied to geographical areas and theoretical issues.

200. History of Anthropology. 3 hr.; 3 cr
Prerequisites: 6 credits in anthropology or permission of instructor.
A survey of anthropological theories, methods, and practitioners from anthropology's inception to the present.

201. Essentials of Cultural Anthropology. 3 hr.; 3 cr
Prerequisites: 6 credits in social science or sophomore standing.
Ethnography - the descriptive study of peoples - is the cornerstone of anthropological endeavor. This course explores the relationship between intensive examinations of small populations and broad interpretations of the human condition. Emphasis is placed on close analyses of ethnographies representing different theoretical positions.

203. Human Sexuality. 3 hr.; 3 cr,
Sexuality is examined from the perspective of both physical and cultural anthropology. Topics covered include: an examination of Western approaches to sexuality; the history of sexology with particular reference to the contributions of anthropologists; the evolution of sexual reproduction (with special reference to distinctively human aspects); sexual practices and ideology considered cross-culturally.

204. Anthropology of Islam. 3 hr.; 3 cr,
Prereq. ANTH 101 or permission of the instructor.
Introduction to the diversity of Islamic traditions and local practices from an anthropological perspective. The course explores the variety of Islamic practices and beliefs in the world, and also focuses on the particular debates and transformations of religion in the modern world.

Cultural Area Courses Note: The department publishes specific descriptions of its "Regional Peoples" courses each semester they are offered that are appropriate for the faculty member or adjunct offering the course.

205. Peoples of Mexico and Central America. 3 hr.; 3 cr
Prereq.: Six credits in social science or sophomore standing. +

206. Peoples of South America. 3 hr.; 3 cr
Prereq.: Six credits in social science or sophomore standing. +
This course surveys, from ethnographic and theoretical perspectives, the social groups in conflict in contemporary Latin America. Special emphasis is laid upon accounting of the actual behavior of peasants, shantytown dwellers, the military, clergy, great capitalists, and the international financial community in the process of social conflict and revolution. Every effort will be made to provide a historical context for the conflicts of today, through lecture, reading, and film.

207. Native North Americans. 3 hr.; 3 cr
Prereq.: Six credits in social science or sophomore standing.

208. Peoples of South Asia. 3 hr.; 3 cr,
Prereq.: Six credits in social science or sophomore standing. ++

209. Peoples of Europe. 3 hr.; 3 cr,
Prereq.: Six credits in social science or sophomore standing. ++

210. Peoples of East Asia. 3 hr.; 3 cr,
Prereq.: Six credits in social science or sophomore standing. ++
This course examines various cultures in East Asia from an anthropological perspective drawing on ethnographic and theoretical readings. The primary topics include cultural performance, religion, gender, ethnicity, media and globalization. Students will learn about the diverse cultures of East Asia with special attention paid to historical contexts and power relations. Students will conduct a research project with a final paper. Class discussion and presentations are required.

211. Peoples of Africa. 3 hr.; 3 cr,
Prereq.: Six credits in social science or sophomore standing. ++

212. Peoples of the Middle East. 3 hr.; 3 cr,
This course examines anthropological approaches to the Middle East and North Africa. We will investigate who inhabits this vast geographical area, as well as the region’s diverse traditions, beliefs, histories and practice. We will discuss the cultural changes that have emerged in the wake of social, political and economic transformations from the colonial period to the present. Previous knowledge of Middle Eastern history, geography or anthropology is not required. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prerequisite: 6 credits in social science or sophomore standing.
Prereq.: Six credits in social science or sophomore standing. ++

213. Peoples of the Contemporary United States. 3 hr.; 3 cr,
Prereq.: Six credits in social science or sophomore standing. ++
What is "American culture"? How is it understood and experienced by Native, white, black, Latino, and Asian Americans, and by persons of different gender, sexual orientation, age, religion, immigrant/citizen status, and economic position? Anthropologists engage these big questions in ethnographic case studies of particular groups and locales, and they interpret their findings within wider cultural, historical, and political economic contexts. Through ethnographies, films, and class lectures drawing on the instructor's fieldwork in Queens, this course applies anthropological thinking to current debate about race, immigration, family life, sexuality, youth culture, the elderly, religious pluralism, and economic transformation in the contemporary USA.

214. Peoples of New York City. 3 hr.; 3 cr,
Prereq.: Six credits in social science or sophomore standing. ++

215, 215W. Peoples of the Caribbean. 3 hr.; 3 cr,
Prereq.: Six credits in social science or sophomore standing. ++
This course addresses the culture and societies of the Caribbean. Because of the Caribbean's long history of economic exploitation and cultural diversity, it has been a region in which peoples meet. This has generated both innovation and enmity. Consequently, this course will examine relationships of the different groups which inhabit the region, their conflicts and creations, and the influence of global economic and political factors on the region.

219. Topics in Cultural Area Studies. 3 hr.; 3 cr,
Prereq.: Six credits in social science or sophomore standing.
Topics will be announced. This course may be repeated provided the topic is not the same. ++

220. Food and Culture. 3 hr.; 3 cr,
Prereq.: Six credits in social science or sophomore standing.
This course introduces students to anthropological concepts and research that bear on the subjects of food, eating, nutrition, and disease. Topics covered include origins of human food-related behaviors; changing dietary patterns as revealed by archaeology and physical anthropology; cultural aspects of diet, disease, and malnutrition; the relationship between diet and social organization, as well as symbolic aspects of human food taboos and preferences. +


222. Sex, Gender and Culture. 3 hr.; 3 cr,
Prereq.: Six credits in social science or sophomore standing.
This course will examine the social construction of gender in a wide range of cultures. Beginning with the question of the degree to which gender roles are biologically determined, we will focus our attention on the divergence of gender roles and the nature of gender inequality throughout the world. We will analyze power dynamics between men and women at the household level, the community level, and in the larger context of the state for a variety of societies ranging from foragers in Africa to peasants in China, to professionals in the United States. We will discuss the ways in which women in different cultures obtain degrees of autonomy and power within their cultural contexts. The course will draw on theoretical and ethnographic readings dealing primarily with non-western societies. +

223. Family, Kin and Friends. 3 hr.; 3 cr,
Prereq.: Six credits in social science or sophomore standing.
The goal of this course is to understand the changes occurring in contemporary family, kin, and friend relationships by an evolutionary and comparative examination of such structures from other times and other cultures. ++

224. Religion: Belief and Ritual. 3 hr.; 3 cr,
Prereq.: Six credits in social science or sophomore standing. ++

225. Medical Anthropology. 3 hr.; 3 cr,
Prereq.: Six credits in social science or sophomore standing.
This course focuses on the interaction of cultural, biological, and ecological factors that may influence human health. Specific areas to be covered will include the transmission of infectious disease, nutritional deficiencies, and inherited diseases. +

227. Educational Anthropology. 3 hr.; 3 cr,
Prereq.: Six credits in social science or sophomore standing.
Anthropological approaches to the study of education and culture transmission in this and other societies. A consideration of education as a cultural institution from the cross-cultural perspective. ++

229. Practicing Anthropology. 3 hr.; 3 cr,
Prereq.: Nine credits in anthropology or instructor's permission.
This course offers a brief overview of the field of Practicing (Applied) Anthropology. Beginning with a history of the field and through selected case studies, it examines the reciprocal relationship between general theory and practice, looks at the ethical and intellectual problems confronted by anthropologists when they make or enable government policy, and describes the various areas - health, education, intercultural communication, business, social services, government, law - which currently employ anthropologists to solve problems. ++

231W. Music, Culture and Society. 3 hr.; 3 cr,
Prereq.: Six credits in social science or sophomore standing, and English 110.
In examining the social and cultural significance of music, this course focuses on representing the relationship between music, culture and society through writing. No knowledge of music theory is required.

232. Visual Anthropology. 3 hr.; 3 cr,
Prereq.: Six credits in social science or sophomore standing.
Development of perceptual, interpretive, and technical skills for the use of visual media in ethnographic representation.

233. Race, Class and Ethnicity. 3 hr.; 3 cr,
Prereq.: Six credits in social science or sophomore standing.
Physical differences among human populations are complex, continuous and include many more invisible than visible traits. After brief consideration of human genetic variation around the world, we examine cultural schemes that segment and compress this diversity into a small number of "races." Racial systems emerge in particular historical and cultural settings, always involve differences in power, and vary from society to society. Readings and lectures focus on inequality and its relationship to concepts of race, ethnicity, and class in different parts of the world. ++

235. Essentials of Practical Culture Study. 3 hr.; 3 cr,+
Prereq.: Anthropology 101, 102, and 104.
Through classroom instruction and practical exercises, both in Anthropology's Cultural Diversity Laboratory and in the field, students will develop the practical skills, specific abilities, and anthropological perspectives essential for successfully conducting and reporting the ethnographic field experience.

238. Research Design and Method. 3 hr.; 3 cr,
Prereq.: Six credits in anthropology.
This course shows students how anthropologists go about answering the questions they ask. We look at how research is designed, how data are collected and analyzed, and how empirical results are presented. Students will learn the fundamentals of sampling, descriptive and inferential statistics, and techniques for displaying relationships graphically. ++

239. 239W Topics in Cultural Anthropology. 3 hr.; 3 cr,
Prereq.: Six credits in social science or sophomore standing.
Topics will be announced. The Course may be repeated provided the topic is not the same. It may be offered as a Writing Intensive Course. ++

240. Essentials of Archaeology. 3 hr.; 3 cr.
Prereq.: Six credits in social science or sophomore standing.
An examination of archaeological techniques and methods of interpretation that provide the basis for reconstruction of the lifeways of past cultures.

241. The Aztecs, Maya, and Olmecs. 3 hr.; 3 cr.
Prereq.: Six credits in social science or sophomore standing.
The development of complex societies in Mexico and Central America focusing on the Olmecs, Maya, Aztecs, Mixtecs, and Teothuacan. Pre-16th century development of agriculture, the concept of zero, intricate calendars, writing, political and religious hierarchies, and immense ceremonial architecture in relation to general explanations for the emergence and collapse of complex societies. ++

242, 242W. Archaeology of Europe. 3 hr.; 3 cr.
Prereq.: Six credits in social science or sophomore standing.
This lecture course traces the major themes in the cultural development of Europe. From the florescence of Paleolithic art through the spread of Indo-European languages to the impact of the Roman Empire on the Celtic world, this course tracks the changing forms of social integration. ++

243. Archaeology of North America. 3 hr.; 3 cr.
Prereq.: Six credits in social science or sophomore standing.
Examines the development of North American cultures from the arrival of humans on the continent, through the impact of European colonization. ++

245. Archaeology of South America. 3 hr.; 3 cr.
Prereq.: Six credits in social science or sophomore standing. Examines the development of cultures from the first peopling of South America to the arrival of the Europeans. ++

246, 246W. Archaeology of the Near East. 3 hr.; 3 cr. 
Prereq.: Six credits in social science or sophomore standing.
The Near East is considered the locus of many of the world's most significant sociocultural "firsts," including the origins of agriculture, the earliest cities, the earliest writing system, and some of the world's oldest empires. This course reviews the archaeology of the Near East from the Mesolithic (ca. 18,000 BC) to the aftermath of the Bronze Age (ca. 1000 BC), and discusses current academic debates over some of the sociocultural "firsts" attributed to it. In addition, we will look at the history of archaeology in the region and consider its political context in the past and present. ++

247. Archaeology of Ireland. 3 hr.; 3 cr. 
Prereq.: English 110. Six credits in social science or sophomore standing.
The development of Irish society from initial settlement by foraging peoples through the development of agriculture and metallurgy to the origins of chiefdoms and states. Special attention is given to the Celtic Iron Age Society. ++

249. Topics in Archaeological Area Studies.3 hr.; 3 cr.
Prereq.: Six credits in social science or sophomore standing or permission of instructor.
Topics will be announced. Course may be repeated provided the topic is not the same. ++
Topic: Encountering the Other: The Anthropology of First Contact. This course explores “first contact” (human encounters with the previously unknown) from an anthropological perspective. We will consider three case studies, the first being the conquest-era encounter between the Spanish and the indigenous peoples of Mexico. We will learn about how the Spanish conquistadors and those they conquered held cultural predispositions that shaped their views and reactions to one another. Second, we will consider how evolutionary research into human origins casts our hominid ancestors as the “Other”; social and ideological perspectives about our evolutionary past and future, as well as what it means to be human, will be examined. The final case study reflects on intersections of anthropology and fiction, exploring truly alien encounters in science fiction literature. Here we consider potential motivations driving us to explore unknown worlds.

250. Field Methods in Archaeology. 250.1-250.6, 1-6 hr.; 1-6 cr.,
Prereq.: Anthropology 103 or 240.
Field training in archaeological survey and excavation in actual selected field sites. Basic archaeological field techniques will be taught and students will develop skills in scientific data-recording procedures.  Prehistoric sites will be located, mapped, and described, and cultural materials will be recovered in the field for subsequent laboratory analysis.  Course may be retaken, for a maximum combined total of 6 credits.++

259. Topics in Archaeology. 3 hr.; 3 cr.
Prereq.: Anthropology 103 or 240.Topics will be announced. Course may be repeated provided the topic is not the same. ++

260. Essentials of Biological Anthropology. 3 hr.; 3 cr.
Prereq.: Anthropology 102 or any college biology course.
Focuses on the process of human biological evolution.

262. Introduction to Primates. 3 hr.; 3 cr.,
Prereq.: Anthropology 102 or permission of department.
A comprehensive overview of the Order Primates from both a biological and a behavioral/ecological focus, this course examines the similarities and differences between human and primate behavior and biology and their implications for human evolution. +

270. Human Disease. 3 hr.; 3 cr.
Prereq.: Anthropology 102 or any college biology course.
This course is an introduction to the principles and methods used by epidemiologists to determine the causes and study the distribution of diseases in human populations. Cultural aspects of disease are integrated with archaeology and physical anthropology in a broad historical survey to illustrate the impact of disease on historic populations. +

272. The Human Skeleton. 3 hr.; 3 cr.,
Prereq.: Anthropology 102 or any college biology course.
Using an anthropological and evolutionary perspective, this course combines an anatomical and functional approach in order to acquaint students with the human skeleton and identification of skeletal remains. Also introduces students to metric studies and to the use of osteometric and anthropometric instruments. ++

275. Disease in Prehistory. 3 hr.; 3 cr.
Prereq.: Anthropology 102 or any college biology course.
Health and biocultural adaptations in prehistoric populations will be explored by examining the effects that stressors such as infectious disease, poor nutrition, traumatic injury, and occupational hazards have on the skeletal system. ++

276, 276W. Evolution of the Human Life Cycle. 3 hr.; 3 cr.
Prereq.: ANTH 102 or permission of the instructor.
An examination of the human life cycle from an evolutionary perspective. Features of the human life cycle such as pregnancy, childbirth, child growth, parental behavior, reproductive behavior, and aging will be compared to those of non-human primates and extinct hominids to try to understand how, when, and why the particular features of the human life cycle evolved.

279. Topics in Biological Anthropology. 3 hr.; 3 cr.
Prereq.: Anthropology 102 or 260 or any college biology course.
Topics will be announced. Course may be repeated provided the topic is not the same. ++

280./LCD 280. Language and Social Identity. 3 hr.; 3 cr.
Prereq.:  6 credits in social science, in courses in the Department of Linguistics and Communication Disorders, or  by permission of instructor.
This course will introduce the linguistic and social theories that are used to examine the relationship between identities and the use of language.  It explores these issues through reading ethnographic accounts and conducting projects in conversational analysis. +

285./LCD 205. Sociolinguistics. 3 hr.; 3 cr.
Prereq.: Anth 108/LCD101, or LCD 105, or Anth 104/LDC104
Introduction to the study of the relationship between language and society.  Socio-cultural factors which influence language form, use, and history.
 
Anth/LCD 288. Voices of New York, 3 hr.; 3 cr.
Immigration has brought hundreds of languages to our city, but what happens to these languages and their speakers once they are here and in contact in New York? What effects do they have on the English spoken here? Is the traditional New York dialect dying out? Is it changing? How distinct is the English of Latinos? East Asian Americans? Africans? South Asians? Is the traditional New York dialect dying out? Is it changing? Do people from different neighborhoods or boroughs speak differently? Which heritage languages are being maintained and which ones are disappearing? Why? How are immigrants’ languages changing? What are the effects of peer-culture such as Hip Hop, Skaters, Geeks, etc. on language? Voices of New York is a seminar for students to explore these questions by conducting their own original research. As they answer their questions, students will learn how to design, conduct, analyze, and present data and conclusions. They will thus gain valuable research skills, which can be applied in other classes as well as in academics, science, government service, and business.
 
289. Topics in Linguistic Anthropology. 3 hr.; 3 cr.
Prereq.: 6 credits in social science or in courses in the Department of Linguistics and Communication Disorders, or sophomore standing, or by permission of instructor.
Topics will be announced. Course may be repeated once for credit provided the topic is different.
 
290W. Topics in Anthropology. 3 hr.; 3 cr.
Prereq.: English 110.
This course will have exams that include essay questions and 10-15 pages of writing (either several short papers or one longer paper done in stages).  Opportunity will be provided for students to receive  feedback or their writing and for explanation of the necessary ingredients of  a good paper and good writing.  May be repeated for credit provided the topic is different.
 
295.  Independent Studies in Anthropology.  295.1-295.6, 1-6 hr.; 1-6 cr.
Prereq.: Three of the introductory anthropology courses (101, 102, 103, 104), one course from among Anthropology 201, 235, 240 or 260, and permission of the instructor.

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ADVANCED COURSES
The 300-level courses are designed to integrate the major with seminars and research. These are Senior level courses often with frequent writing assignments.

302. Ecology and Culture. 3 hr.; 3 cr.
Prereq.: Nine credits in anthropology and junior standing.
This seminar focuses on the question, why do cultures change? Taking ethnographic and archaeological examples of foragers, herders and farmers, the class will examine the relationship between environmental change, human population growth, technological change, the organization of the economy, and the exercise of power. ++

304. Anthropology of Development. 3 hr.; 3 cr.
Prereq.: Twelve credits in anthropology including 200 and 201 as a pre- or co-requisite or permission of instructor.
Third world and indigenous peoples are being incorporated more fully into the modern world system by means of processes generally labeled as "development." Through an examination of several cases, this course will analyze the economic, political, cultural, demographic, and ecological impacts of this process. ++
 
306. Anthropology of Religion. 3 hr.; 3 cr.
Prereq.: Twelve credits in anthropology including 200 and 201 as a prerequisite or co-requisite or permission of instructor.
This course explores theoretical debates in anthropology concerning religion. In doing so, it addresses both the issue of general theories of religion and their applicability in specific cultural contexts .+

308. Urban Anthropology. 3 hr.; 3 cr.
Prereq.: Twelve credits in anthropology including 200 and 201 as a prerequisite or co-requisite or permission of instructor.
An introduction to cities in historical and global perspective, this course examines urban origins, theories of development of pre-industrial cities, transformations of urban life in the industrial revolution, and the interplay of race, ethnicity, class and gender in contemporary cities around the world. Final focus is on U.S. centers and forms of cultural and economic integration that mark all settlements in the contemporary global arena. +
 
309. Psychological Anthropology. 3 hr.; 3 cr.
Prereq.: Nine credits in anthropology, including 201 or 240 or 260. ++
This course examines the major theoretical movements in the field of psychological anthropology by surveying four major issues in the field: the relationship of phylogeny and ontogeny; motivation, personality, and mental illness; ethnopsychologies; and cognition. In all four, the central theme is the relationship of culture to behavior or thought.
 
320. Contemporary Anthropological Theory. 3 hr.; 3 cr.
Prereq.: Twelve credits in anthropology including 200 and 201 as a prerequisite or co-requisite or permission of instructor.
This course provides an overview of contemporary anthropological theory, including symbolic, interpretive, Marxist, poststructuralist, postmodern, feminist and historical anthropology. We will read articles by leading theorists and ethnographies, which utilize contemporary theory.++
 
330. Seminar in Cultural Anthropology. 3 hr.; 3 cr.
Prereq.: Twelve credits in anthropology including 200 and 201 as a pre- or co-requisite or permission of instructor.
Course may be repeated for credit provided the topic is different.
 
340. Archaeological Method and Theory. 3 hr.; 3 cr.
Prereq.: Twelve credits in anthropology, including 240 and at least one course numbered 241 to 259, and junior standing.
In this seminar, students will examine the theories that have guided archaeological research, and the methods developed to pursue these goals.
 
342. Origins of Complex Society. 3 hr.; 3 cr.
Prereq.: Nine credits in anthropology, including at least two courses numbered 200 or higher.
This course examines the appearance and development of institutionalized inequalities, and the major forms of political organization humans have devised. Proposed explanations for these phenomena will be evaluated against ethnographic and archaeological examples of complex societies. ++

350. Seminar in Archaeology. 3 hr.; 3 cr.
Prereq.: Twelve credits in anthropology including at least one course numbered 240 to 259 and junior standing.
Course may be repeated for credit provided the topic is different. ++
 
354. Time. 3 hr.; 3 cr.
Prereq.: ANTH 101 or 103, and 6 credits of courses which satisfy the Analyzing Social Structures PLAS requirement, 3 credits of Culture and Values, and 3 credits of Natural Science. The exploration of human understanding and experience of time from multiple perspectives including the social sciences, philosophy, literature, and the natural sciences.
 
360. History of Biological Anthropology. 3 hr.; 3 cr.
Prereq.: Twelve credits in anthropology including at least one course numbered 260 to 279 and junior standing or permission of instructor.
The primary target of this course is to provide a comprehensive overview of the history of scientific inquiry into the origin and variation of the human species. A central theme is the development of evolutionary thinking, which involves a consideration of changing scientific views of nature and Homo from the Renaissance to the Enlightenment - which set the stage for Darwin's work in the 19th century - and the subsequent emergence of the modern evolutionary synthesis. Readings and lectures are directed to an understanding of not only specific concepts and the debates they have engendered, but also the nature of the scientific enterprise. ++
 
361. Human Variation. 3 hr.; 3 cr.
Prereq.: Anthropology 260 or two college biology courses and junior standing.
Humans live in a greater variety of environments than any other animal. This course will examine the ways in which humans adapt biologically and culturally to different environments, and how this adaptation has produced the biological variation seen in contemporary human populations. Major topics to be covered include human growth, nutritional variation, disease, and adaptations to climatic stresses such as heat, cold, high altitude and solar radiation.
 
362. Human Paleontology. 3 hr.; 3 cr.
Prereq.: Anthropology 260 or two college biology courses and junior standing.
Human paleontology is a study of the fossil evidence for human evolution. This class will examine morphological diversity of extinct human taxa, to better understand the biological relationships, behaviors, and adaptations of our extinct relatives, and to gain a deeper understanding of when the characteristics defining modern humans emerged.†
 
363. Interpreting the Human Skeleton. 3 hr. lec., 1 hr. lab.; 4 cr.
Prereq.: ANTH 260 or two college level biology courses, ANTH 272, ANTH 103, and junior standing.
An interdisciplinary approach to research on human skeletal remains from archaeological contexts, introducing students to widely accepted methods for 
reconstructing patterns of subsistence, diet, disease, demography, and physical activity based principally on the analysis of such remains.

368. Evolution and Human Behavior. 3 hr.; 3 cr.,
3 hrs. 3 credits. Prerequisites: 12 credits in Anthropology, including Anthropology 101 and 102.
This course focuses on two general areas of inquiry that link evolutionary theory with human behavior. The first is the use of behavioral and ecological data from nonhuman primates and modern humans, in concert with evidence from the fossil record, to reconstruct social and ecological evolution in hominins from ca. 5 million years ago to the present. The second is the use of evolutionary theory to elucidate modern human cognition and behavior. This course involves a critical examination of the theory behind these general areas of inquiry as well as the research findings themselves. This is a seminar course that involves reading and discussion of original research in a small classroom setting.

369. Primate Behavior and Ecology. 3 hr.; 3 cr.,
Prereq.: Anthropology 260 or 262 or two college biology courses and junior standing, or permission of the instructor.
Examination of the behavior and ecology of non-human primates -- lemurs, lorises, galagos, tarsiers, monkeys and apes -- from a biological and evolutionary perspective. Topics include feeding ecology, predation, socioecology, sexual selection, kin selection, altruism, dominance, life history, reproduction, mating behavior, reproductive strategies, cognition, social intellegence, and communication. The behavioral ecology of primates will also be compared to that of other mammals as a means of seeing how primates fit into their natural world.
 
370. Seminar in Biological Anthropology. 3 hr.; 3 cr.
Prereq.: Twelve credits in anthropology, including at least one course numbered 260-279, and junior standing.
Course may be repeated for credit provided the topic is different. ++
 
371. Nutritional Anthropology. 3 hr.; 3 cr.
Prereq.: Nine credits in anthropology and junior standing, or permission of the instructor.
This seminar course will examine the ways that anthropologists study food and nutrition, ranging from human nutritional requirements and the evolution of human diet to the theoretical approaches that can be used to analyze and explain human diet.
 
375. The Human-Primate Interface.
Prereq.: Senior standing.
Exploration of the interface between humans and nonhuman primates from a multidisciplinary perspective. Topics include the behavioral biology and ecology of nonhuman primates; the contribution that nonhuman primates can make to the study of the evolution of social behavior and language in humans; the history of primatology as a science; gender issues in science and primatology; the cultural role of primates in societies past and present; the relationship between humans and animals from a philosophical perspective; and historical, economic, and ecological issues related to nonhuman primate conservation, commensalism, and human-wildlife conflict across the globe.
 
380. Seminar in Linguistic Anthropology. 3 hr.; 3 cr.
Prereq.: 12 credits in anthropology or linguistics, or by permission of instructor.
Topics will be announced. Course may be repeated for credit provided the topic is different.
 
390. Senior Honors Thesis. 3 hr.; 3 cr.
Prereq.: Major in anthropology, junior standing, at least 21 credits completed, a grade point average of 3.5 and departmental permission.
Majors who have a grade point average of 3.5 or better and who would like to receive high honors in Anthropology, may apply to write a Senior Honors Thesis. They should apply to the department during their junior year for permission. The honors thesis will be on a subject chosen by them in consultation with a member of the faculty. A faculty member will work with them to develop an appropriate research project, prepare a bibliography and establish a research design appropriate to the project. Students who complete this project with a B or better will receive high honors in Anthropology.
 
395.1 - 395.6. Directed Studies in Anthropology. 1-6 hr.; 1-6 cr.
Prereq.: Anthropology major with at least 24 credits in anthropology and junior standing, or permission of instructor.
The student undertakes a topic of study on an independent basis and pursues it under the supervision of a member of the faculty. This course may be repeated provided the topic is not the same. No more than 6 credits can be taken in the 395 series. ++
 
397.1 - 397.12. Directed Research in Anthropology. 1-12 hr.; 1-12 cr.
Prereq.: Anthropology major with at least 24 credits in anthropology and junior standing, or permission of instructor.
The student undertakes an individual research problem and pursues it under the supervision of a member of the faculty. Maximum of 12 credits applicable to Baccalaureate Degree. No more than 12 credits can be taken in the 397 series.
 
397.6. Ethnographic Fieldwork in Flushing.
6 credits
This course offers students an opportunity to learn how to do ethnographic fieldwork and to write a short ethnography. Imagine yourself set down in a small urban neighborhood and asked to produce a fieldwork-based account some four months later. This is what you and other fieldwork team-members will do. The research site lies between the college and downtown Flushing, and contains shopping strips, houses of worship (Hindu, Christian, Muslim, Buddhist), parks, a greenbelt, schools, a hospital, a senior center, and a large, culturally diverse population. You will learn to write ethnographic fieldnotes as you explore the area, map its cultural features, do a survey of stores, conduct group interviews with key informants and cultural experts, learn about various cuisines in neighborhood grocery stores and restaurants (Chinese, South Asian, Afghan, Korean, Colombian, Italian, Russian, Singa’s Pizza), and select one location or event for individual participant observation. We will also utilize census data and other documentary and internet materials in the Ethnographic computer lab, Powdermaker 206. Over the semester you will progress from producing to analyzing and coding fieldnotes, to developing an outline, and to writing your ethnographic account of the study area, including social, economic, political, and religious aspects. Bring a small notebook to the first class, and be prepared to do a lot of walking. Weather permitting, we will spend most Fridays in the field, and as research objectives sharpen participant observation at other times may also occur, including one Sunday.

Prereq: 24 credits in Anthropology or permission of instructor. This course counts as one 300-level course for the Anthropology major.


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